Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, ISSN - 0973 - 709X

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Original article / research
Table of Contents - Year : 2016 | Month : July | Volume : 10 | Issue : 7 | Page : LC01 - LC04

Reconstructive Surgery Camp for Leprosy Deformities in a Tertiary Hospital: An Example of Service Delivery at Low Costs LC01-LC04

Nikita R. Bhatt, Gaurav A. Kakked, Kinnari Vyas, Rajiv Merchant

Correspondence
Dr. Gaurav A. Kakked,
92/A Kunj Society Alkapuri, Akota, Baroda, India.
E-mail: drkakked@gmail.com

Introduction: Seventy percent of all cases of leprosy in the world occur in India. 8,462 new cases of disability were reported in India between 2010-11. Reconstructive Surgery Camps (RSC) provide free of cost plastic surgical expertise to patients of leprosy with deformity.

Aim: The aim of this article was to report the outcomes of a RSC in a tertiary level university hospital in India. We also described the types of deformities in the patient group and the cost of conducting such a camp.

Materials and Methods: The RSC involved 130 patients with leprosy related deformities operated by a team of plastic surgeons in a tertiary university hospital over 5 days. Health workers of the National Leprosy Elimination Program identified patients at community level. The camp was funded by the central government of India and the patients were provided incentives for undergoing treatment.

Results: Plantar ulcer was the commonest deformity (51.5%) while lagopthalmos (9.2%) was the least common deformity in the patient group. The overall complication rate in our study was around 10.6% (n=11). The total cost of this camp was 730,000 rupees (7029.9).

Conclusion: Reconstructive surgery in a camp setup is a low cost alternative of correcting leprosy related deformity. It also provides valuable practical experience in reconstructive surgery to surgical trainees. Tertiary hospital based camps for conducting large-scale surgeries may be a cost effective alternative to reduce waiting lists in public health sectors. Long-term studies monitoring patients operated in a camp setting would be worthwhile.