Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, ISSN - 0973 - 709X

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Original article / research
Table of Contents - Year : 2017 | Month : May | Volume : 11 | Issue : 5 | Page : AC01 - AC04

Correlation of Prostate Gland Size and Uroflowmetry in Patients with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms AC01-AC04

Deepak Sundaram, Ponnusamy Kasirajan Sankaran, Gunapriya Raghunath, S Vijayalakshmi, J Vijayakumar, Maria Francis Yuvaraj, Munnusamy Kumaresan, Zareena Begum

Correspondence
Dr. Deepak Sundaram,
Department of Anatomy, Saveetha Medical College and Hospital, Thandalam, Chennai-602105, Tamil Nadu, India.
E-mail: drpks@live.com;dsdeepaksai@gmail.com

Introduction: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) is a common entity among men over 40 years of age with significant disability. It is a condition that occurs when the enlarged prostate gland compresses the urethra leading to Bladder Outlet Obstruction (BOO).

Aim: To correlate the size of the prostate gland and uroflowmetry parameters in patients with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS).

Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty randomly selected male patients, from the ages of 41 to 70 years, with LUTS, and underwent trans abdominal sonogram and uroflowmetry were included in the study. The samples were divided into three groups according to the age; Group 1: 41 to 50 years, Group 2: 51 to 60 years, Group 3: 61 to 70 years.

Results: In Group 1 (41 to 50 years), there were totally 28 patients with LUTS, out of which seven patients had BPH, indicating that about 5% of patients with LUTS have BPH. In Group 2 (51-60 years) there were totally 31 patients with LUTS, out of which 10 patients had BPH, indicating that 8% of patients with LUTS have BPH. In Group 3 (61-70 years) there were totally 61 patients with LUTS, out of which 33 patients had BPH, indicating that 27% of patients with LUTS had BPH. The mean age of patients with LUTS was 60 years with mean prostate size of 45 cm3. Enlarged prostate gland was present in 41% of patients with mean Q max of 14 ml/sec and post voidal volume of 48 ml.

Conclusion: This study concludes that the LUTS in older patients are mostly due to BPH leading to BOO. Also, patients with BPH in early ages can lead to increased Post voidal Residual Volume (PVR) following uroflowmetry. Thus, screening male patients with LUTS, at 40 years and above, is an ideal way to detect prostatic problems at an early stage.