Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, ISSN - 0973 - 709X

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Original article / research
Table of Contents - Year : 2017 | Month : September | Volume : 11 | Issue : 9 | Page : PC01 - PC05

Aspects of Evolving Genito Urinary Tuberculosis-A Profile of Genito Urinary Tuberculosis (GUTB) in 110 Patients PC01-PC05

Sriram Krishnamoorthy, Velmurugan Palaniyandi, Natarajan kumaresan, Sivasankar Govindaraju, Jayaganesh Rajasekaran, Ilangovan Murugappan, Venkat Ramanan, Muthulatha Navaneetha Krishnan

Correspondence
Dr. Sriram Krishnamoorthy,
Department of Urology, Sri Ramachandra Medical College, Porur, Chennai - 600116, Tamil Nadu, India.
E-mail: sriramuro@gmail.com

Introduction: Genito Urinary Tuberculosis (GUTB) is a widespread disease seen in urology practice. The true incidence and prevalence of GUTB is difficult to estimate because a large number of patients remain asymptomatic.

Aim: To recognize typical and atypical clinical and radiological features of tuberculosis and to emphasize the need for diagnosing GUTB early.

Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study conducted in 110 cases of GUTB diagnosed and treated in two teaching institutions over a period of three years, from July 2002 to June 2005. A detailed history, thorough clinical examination, urine examination, culture for tubercle bacillus, imaging studies, cystoscopy and histological and serological examination were done to arrive at a diagnosis.

Results: Fifty six patients (51%) were in the age group of 21-40 years. The male: female ratio was 1.4: 1. Loin pain was the most common symptom observed in 27% of the patients. Intravenous Urogram (IVU) revealed non-visulalised kidney in 25 patients (23%), hydronephrosis or hydrouretero nephrosis in 34 patients (31%) and distortion, cavitation or scarring of the calyces in 16 patients (14.5%). Five of them had thimble bladder. In 14 patients, IVU appeared normal. About 28 patients (25%) were treated conservatively with anti tuberculosis therapy. Twenty one of them (19%) underwent Nephrectomy and 10 patients had reconstructive procedures.

Conclusion: A peculiarity of most of our patients was a late presentation with advanced disease. Most patients were asymptomatic or ignorant. Slow but continuous infection causes a destruction of renal parenchyma and the healing process leads to renal parenchymal loss. If identified early and treated appropriately, GUTB is a curable condition.